Highlights from the May/June Issue of RNJ

If you are an ARN member or a Rehabilitation Nursing Journal (RNJ) subscriber, you should soon receive your May/June 2020 issue in the mail. Check out a preview of three great articles that will be gracing the pages of this issue, or visit the journal online to read the full issue.

Design and Usability of the Stroke Caregiver Support System: A Mobile-Friendly Website to Reduce Stroke Caregiver Burden

As rehabilitation nurses, we know the strain and burden that a stroke family caregiver can experience. Oftentimes this strain manifests itself as depression. This article by Caunca and colleagues describes the development of a mobile-friendly website for stroke caregivers. The purpose of the website, the Stroke Caregiver Support System (SCSS), is to decrease stroke caregiver burden by providing information about stroke and practical advice in providing care for the stroke survivor. Read Design and Usability of the Stroke Caregiver Support System: A Mobile-Friendly Website to Reduce Stroke Caregiver Burden.

A Pilot Study Exploring Treatment Burden in a Skilled Nursing Population
As individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) transition from a skilled nursing facility to home, a number of issues arise regarding care. Schreiner measured the treatment burden of these individuals at predischarge and 30 days after discharge. Although treatment burden did not differ between the two points in time (no statistical significance), the lack of a full-time caregiver assisting with self-management tasks demonstrated that the discharged individuals with MCC were at risk for high levels of treatment burden. Read A Pilot Study Exploring Treatment Burden in a Skilled Nursing Population. 

Parkinson's Disease: Exploring Motives for Long-Term Adherence to a Group Exercise Program

For many clients with chronic illness, there are benefits of exercise as an adjuvant treatment. Group exercise programs have proven helpful for many clients. However well-intentioned clients may be when beginning a group exercise program, many do not maintain such activity. Cleary interviewed a group of 18 clients with Parkinson's disease who had maintained their exercise program over a period of years. Yes, years, not weeks or months. Findings of this study identify factors that may increase adherence rates in group exercise programs. Read Parkinson's Disease: Exploring Motives for Long-Term Adherence to a Group Exercise Program.

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